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Pro-curo software

Fully compliant with the FDA’s 21CFR Part 11 requirements, Pro-curo software stores a complete history of every sample transaction for future traceability, ensuring that irreplaceable samples are monitored and that users always have access to historical reports. It includes powerful search functions, automatic printing of 2D barcodes and a multi-level location structure.

Having a complete audit trail with full traceability is essential in studies involving the use of human material. There remain, however, many laboratories still using traditional paper systems or non-specialist software packages, such as Excel, to track their samples. This creates considerable scope for error and exposes laboratories to the risk of losing samples, with potentially serious consequences for their research. In addition, the inability to prove the source and movement of samples could lead to the confiscation of materials, with severe financial implications for institutions.

Pro-curo software can track samples from multiple research projects. It also has functions to remotely book samples in and out and supports 2D barcoding. This means Pro-curo Software’s tracking and reporting solution is the most comprehensive possible, and can be incorporated into a variety of existing systems across a range of laboratory types.

Every Pro-curo software user has complete access – by phone, email or live chat – to the company’s 24-hour customer support system, for round-the-clock security.

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