PRESS RELEASE

Nexus Copy Number 6.0

BioDiscovery has released version 6.0 of its Nexus Copy Number software, a platform for DNA copy number analysis from CGH and SNP array data. Tools to handle complex genomes, new methods to identify high frequency aberrations, and more user control over display and reporting are among the many new features.

Nexus Copy Number version 6 integrates the Genomic Identification of Significant Targets in Cancer (GISTIC) algorithm for identifying significant regions of common genomic aberrations as well as the Allele-Specific Copy Number Analysis of Tumours (ASCAT) algorithm for addressing sample aneuploidy and mosaicism to its repertoire of existing algorithms and approaches. In addition, a significant number of new capabilities have been added to version 6 to provide the user more control over display and reporting and generation of publication quality graphics.

The software can integrate and process together, in a single project, data from commercial array platforms such as Agilent, Affymetrix, Illumina, Roche NimbleGen, Next Gen read depth, as well as custom arrays. With its free access to a web-based repository for querying, and storing genomic data from any location across the globe, Nexus Copy Number is a powerful solution for large groups such as special consortia. The software is applicable to many types of studies from focused projects of a cytogeneticist to large-scale cancer or GWAS studies.

Company: 
Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers