PRESS RELEASE

Logistics 1.3

Symyx Technologies has launched Symyx Logistics 1.3, designed to improve R&D productivity and synthesis confidence by effectively managing the chemical reagent procurement and inventory tracking needs of laboratories and research centres. Symyx Logistics 1.3 adds the content of Symyx Screening Compounds Directory (SCD) to the previously available content of Symyx Available Chemicals Directory (ACD). This integration increases the coverage of compounds from 500,000 to more than 6 million, creating the largest and most diverse collection of electronically searchable starting materials and screening compounds.

The additional features of Symyx Logistics 1.3 include support for the capture and search of custom environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk and hazard phrases; enhanced list management capabilities; enhanced structure querying, including search by salt forms, isomers, parent and tautomers; and enhanced data handling for nonstructure-based entities and lab supplies. As well as offering integration with leading eprocurement platforms such as SAP, Ariba, Microsoft Dynamics and Oracle eProcurement, Symyx Logistics 1.3 also features updates to shopping cart functionality, including the ability to flag or add comments to internal requests and/or purchase requests by line item.

Symyx Logistics maximises the efficiency of chemical inventory and procurement workflow in biopharmaceutical and chemical research centres. The system integrates with laboratory hardware devices such as barcode printers, scanners, balances and inventory robotics, providing seamless access to in-house inventory data and increasing return on investment through employee time savings and productivity gains.

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