PRESS RELEASE

HyperWorks 12.0 Student Edition

Altair has recently made the HyperWorks 12.0 Student Edition, a computer-aided engineering (CAE) suite, available to aspiring structural and mechanical engineers. The software is free, and provides learning resources designed especially for students which can be found on the Altair Academic Training Center.  In addition, Altair provides students with on-demand interactive support through the moderated Academic Support Forum.

Multi-body dynamics has been included with the addition of MotionSolve.  RADIOSS is a premier crash and impact simulation solver, while AcuSolve is a leading general-purpose computational fluid dynamics solver based on the finite-element method.  HyperStudy will enable students to run 'what-if' scenarios, correlate test data, optimise difficult multi-disciplinary design problems, and assess design reliability and robustness.  Finally, HyperMath offers a powerful and flexible programming language with comprehensive math and utility libraries, while HyperCrash provides a robust pre-processing environment specifically designed to automate the creation of high-fidelity models for crash analysis and safety evaluation.

The HyperWorks Student Edition also includes access to core HyperWorks commercial technologies that support the complete CAE workflow process for various solution types and applications. These include modeling/pre-processing, linear and non-linear analysis, topology optimisation, composites simulation and optimisation, results visualisation/post-processing, data analysis and plotting, and collaboration tools.

‘This program truly demonstrates Altair’s commitment to enhancing students’ learning experience outside the classroom so that they can reinforce their engineering knowledge and classroom instruction,’ said Dr Wei Chen, Wilson-Cook Professor in Engineering Design at Northwestern University.

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