PRESS RELEASE

Chilled Door cooling system

Motivair has introduced its latest Chilled Door ‘Active’ rear door heat exchanger, which is capable of cooling 100 per cent of server rack heat densities up to 45kW per rack using 65F chilled water. According to the company, the Chilled Door provides the highest cooling capacity available for any rear door cooler available. Using a chilled water temperature above the data centre dew point eliminates any possibility of condensation and any requirement for condensate pumps or piping. In addition to cooling the servers, the Chilled door is capable of maintaining the entire data centre space temperature, greatly reducing or eliminating the need for CRAC units or custom air handlers.

An integrated PLC controls Chilled Door EC fan speeds and water flow based on discharge server temperature, leaving air temperature and differential air pressure between servers and room. The PLC also allows for local and remote control and monitoring of all critical functions and an array of critical data points and alarm thresholds with local visual and audible alarms. Under normal operating conditions a highly visible blue LED glow is emitted around the profile of the Chilled Door, visible from all directions and any alarm changes the LED display to red for instant visual identification.

Motivair also offers a Cooling Distribution Unit (CDU), which includes a stainless steel heat exchanger, redundant pumps and PLC controller. The CDU utilises the typical building water at 45F (adjustable) to provide a separate water loop to the Chilled Doors at the typical required temperature of 58-75F (adjustable). The CDU cabinet is designed to match the server rack profile and appearance, and can be installed in or near the data centre to serve six doors at 45kW or 12 doors at 22.5kW per door. An optional underfloor or overhead manifold piped to the CDU provides hydraulic hose quick-connections between the CDU and the Chilled Doors.

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