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Sisu to invigorate Finnish supercomputing

Finland's national state-owned high-performance computing centre, CSC, is building a new supercomputer – a Cray XC30 known as Sisu.

The inauguration of the computer in the town of Kajaani this week brought together representatives of the European HPC community, which is hoping that the machine will provide researchers with extremely high performance computing capability and pave their way towards scientific innovations.

Sisu will offer researchers resources to investigate such subjects as nanotechnology, fusion energy and climate change. At the second stage of the installation, in 2014, Sisu's computing power will reach the petaflop class – capable of one quadrillion floating point operations per second.

'As a part of Datacenter CSC Kajaani, the new supercomputer supports Ministry’s goal of Finland being in the vanguard of knowledge by the year 2020. The Finnish researchers will have access to a state-of-the-art research infrastructure that will also support the internationalisation of research,' said Riitta Maijala, from the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture.

CSC’s new supercomputer Sisu is the first Cray XC30 server in production in Europe. The processors are provided by Intel. 

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