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SciFinder Scholar hits 1,500 subscribers

SciFinder Scholar, a scientific research tool for academia, has registered its 1,500th subscriber.

The milestone was reached as Kean University in Union, New Jersey adopted SciFinder Scholar to serve the science research needs of its faculty and students.

Launched in 1998 by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), SciFinder Scholar is an online research tool that allows college students and faculty to access CAS’ databases of disclosed chemistry and related information from multiple scientific disciplines, including biomedical sciences, chemistry, engineering, materials science, agricultural science and others.

SciFinder Scholar has become the most widely adopted research tool of its kind, with installations at universities throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, North America and South America.

Of the 1,500 SciFinder Scholar subscribing institutions, approximately 800 offer the PhD in chemistry, while over 700 offer MS or BS degrees in chemistry. Harvard University was the first academic institution to subscribe to SciFinder Scholar, and the University of Manchester, England, became the first non-US subscriber, both signing on in 1998.

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