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SC10 seeks HPC game-changers

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The organisers of SC10, the international conference on high-performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, have announced that they are searching for technologies with the potential to disrupt the current technology landscape. As part of the event's annual Disruptive Technologies Programme, SC is providing a dedicated exhibition area featuring such technologies.

Disruptive Technologies, which has taken place as part of SC since 2006, examines new computing architectures and interfaces that will significantly impact the high-performance computing field throughout the next five to 15 years, but have not yet emerged in current systems. Disruptive technologies are described as those that represent drastic innovations in current practices, such that they have the potential to completely transform the high-performance computing field as it currently exists -- ultimately overtaking the leading technologies or software tools in the marketplace.

Since Disruptive Technologies premièred at the conference in 2006, participants have focused on enabling technologies for the most advanced computing systems envisioned for 2020 and beyond. Although the time-frame has been less specific in past years, attendees still use this SC track to predict changes they’ll see in both research and academia high-performance computing in coming years.

'For the SC10 Disruptive Technologies Programme, we will especially focus on critical technologies required to reach exascale computing within the next decade, in which systems will be capable of running a million trillion calculations per second,' said SC10 Disruptive Technologies Programme Chair John Shalf. 'The coming changes to hardware on the path to exascale computing are extremely disruptive, so any technology that overcomes hurdles to exascale computing will be "disruptive" by definition. The SC10 programme will serve as a forum for us to discuss and debate these changing technologies, which we could be adopting in the future,' he added.

SC10, the 23rd annual conference in this series, will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana from November 13–19, 2010. The conference's organisers anticipate more than 11,000 attendees from industry, academia and government.