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Sapio Sciences launches best practice sharing scheme

LIMS provider Sapio Sciences has launched its Sapio Synergy scheme, which aims to develop, enhance and share best practice within its customer and partner base.

Sapio's Exemplar LIMS already enables the rapid development of best practices, ranging from something as simple as a reagent mix recipe calculation, to detailed protocols/workflows, to automated instrument integration. Sapio Synergy will extend this capability to enable the easy importing/exporting of these best practices so they can be shared by other Exemplar LIMS customers. This open sourcing of best practice development allows for rapid uptake of Exemplar LIMS for both existing and new customers as they can now leverage work done by the open source community with Exemplar LIMS.

Sapio will fully support this programme with a secure website where customers can login and download pre-built best practices for use in their own lab. Further, customers can enhance downloaded content and re-submit it as another iteration of the best practice. Best practices can be submitted to Sapio online or by using a dedicated email address. Sapio will test and certify all best practices before making them available to its customers.

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