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OCF appoints big data scientist

In sign of the growing importance of data as well as processing to HPC, the HPC integrator OCF has appointed a Big Data Scientist to the company.

Nick Dingle will engage with UK academia, manufacturing, and healthcare, to help them extract maximum value from their big data, by deploying analytics software.

Drawing on knowledge gathered in previous roles with the Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG), the University of Manchester and Imperial College London, Dingle will consult with customers on the big data analytics challenges they face, design analytics solutions, and deliver proofs of concept projects. Dingle will be working alongside Chris Brown, who leads OCF’s big data division. 

Julian Fielden, managing director, OCF said: ‘We have a long history of integrating HPC or delivering on-demand processing power for customers whilst at the same time managing, storing and archiving big data. Analytics software deployments are a natural evolution for OCF. We’re expanding our team and adding deeper knowledge to ensure our customers continue to get the best advice and solutions- whether that is based on HPC hardware or analytics software.’

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