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Mellanox Technologies completes Kotura acquisition

Mellanox Technologies has completed the acquisition of privately held Kotura, a developer of advanced silicon photonics optical interconnect technology for high-speed networking applications. The deal, first announced in May 2013 and reported here, includes a total cash purchase price of approximately $82 million, subject to certain working capital and other adjustments. According to Mellanox, the transaction enhances its ability to provide leading technologies for high speed, scalable and efficient end-to-end interconnect solutions, and is expected to increase Mellanox’s competiveness to meet the growing demands of high-performance, Web 2.0, cloud, data centre, database, financial services, and storage applications.

‘Through our acquisition of Kotura, we now have the silicon photonics technology to continue the development of best-in-class, next-generation InfiniBand and Ethernet interconnect solutions for 100Gb/s and beyond. This acquisition solidifies our strategy to provide full end-to-end interconnect solutions for our server and storage customers,’ said Eyal Waldman, president and CEO of Mellanox Technologies. ‘We look forward to the integration of Kotura’s technologies into our solutions, and we welcome Kotura’s employees into the Mellanox family.’

Kotura’s current location in Monterey Park, California, will serve as Mellanox’s first R&D centre in the United States.

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