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Juqueen ready for grand challenge

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The most powerful supercomputer in Europe, HPC system Juqueen, has now officially been released for operation at GCS member Jülich Supercomputing Centre.

Juqueen, which currently holds position 5 on the TOP500 list (11/2012), reached its final stage of configuration with the installation of the last four of 28 computer racks. Now, 458,752 compute cores boost the system’s performance to a peak of about six petaflops, a ratio not matched by any other HPC system in Europe.

JSC’s Queen of European Supercomputers was the first HPC system in Europe to pass the five petaflops barrier with its configuration of 24 racks achieved in late 2012. Juqueen was first implemented at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre in May 2012 initially with eight racks, and was gradually expanded to its final configuration featuring 28 racks in early 2013.

The IBM BlueGene/Q system is especially designed for compute intensive, highly scalable applications which can run in parallel on a very high number of compute cores.

'Juqueen is targeted to tackle comprehensive and complex scientific questions, called grand challenges,' said Thomas Lippert, director of JSC. 'Projects from various scientific areas can profit from the system’s performance, e.g. in the areas of neuroscience, computational biology, energy, or climate research. Moreover, it enables complicated calculations in quantum physics, which were not possible before.'