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invivodata and ClinPhone announce ePRO partnership

ClinPhone and invivodata have announced a global partnership to provide electronic patient reported outcomes (ePRO) solutions.

This new partnership will deliver best-of-breed offerings for the two most commonly used ePRO modalities-device-based and IVRS (Interactive Voice Response System) to pharmaceutical and biotech companies.

Doug Engfer, founder, president and CEO of invivodata said: ‘Successful use of ePRO today requires an in-depth understanding of scientific and regulatory considerations, coupled with appropriate technology and complete global support services. invivodata and ClinPhone have collaborated on and shared in many of the same efforts, organisations and events designed to promote sound ePRO research. This formal partnership strengthens this collaboration and delivers real value and best-of-breed solutions to our clients.’ 

Steve Kent, CEO of ClinPhone, said: ‘This partnership also means we are able to provide sponsors with additional balanced and science-based guidance in line with evolving regulatory considerations. ClinPhone ePRO is an IVR-based solution and offers a way to capture patient self-reported data. This ranges from simple diaries to sophisticated health-related quality of life instruments. invivodata's device-based ePRO solutions combine the scientific and regulatory knowledge needed for ePRO with practical technology and proactive services to deliver accurate and reliable PRO data to clinical trial sponsors.

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