NEWS

Illumina to develop next-generation sequencing software

Illumina is to develop and co-market analysis software for single cell next-generation sequencing (NGS) data.

The software will be developed through a partnership with Illumina, and FlowJo, the developer of FlowJo, software for single cell analysis. Under the agreement, FlowJo will develop a new software application to provide additional secondary and tertiary analysis, and visualisation of NGS datasets. The application will also be integrated with Illumina’s Single Cell RNA BaseSpace app.

‘We are excited to partner with Illumina on this project to bring new tools for analysing and visualising NGS data to cell biology,’ said Michael Stadnisky, PhD, CEO of FlowJo. ‘The new offering will enhance the power of single cell biology research by empowering robust exploration of data from Illumina next-generation sequencing runs.’

FlowJo is a privately owned life sciences software company in Ashland, Oregon. Based on technology developed at Stanford, the company was founded in 1997 and provides the leading analysis platform for single cell flow and mass cytometry analysis. This gives the company more than 19 years’ experience working with cell biologists and immunologists in single cell phenotyping.

‘FlowJo is recognised for delivering reliable, high-quality and easy-to-use software solutions that allow cell biologists to study phenotype in individual cells by flow cytometry,’ said Rob Brainin, vice president and general manager, applied genomics at Illumina. ‘We look forward to enabling our customers to bring these trusted FlowJo analytical capabilities to their next-generation sequencing data.’

The software will complement the end-to-end commercial solution for high-throughput sequencing of single cells that Illumina announced it is co-developing in partnership with Bio-Rad Laboratories.

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