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Georgia Tech announces research centre plans

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The Georgia Institute of Technology is to create the Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing, a research centre for innovations in computer architecture. A collaborative effort between the Georgia Tech Colleges of Computing and Engineering, the Center for Manycore Computing (CMC) will address deep, foundational challenges in programming, design and systems development to overcome power and architecture barriers to the progression of computer performance.

'Our mission at the centre is to establish a research agenda that looks well-beyond the short-term and develops innovative and applicable solutions to future limitations on computing progress,' said Tom Conte, professor and director of the planned Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing. 'By projecting out decades, we can better ensure sustained growth in the power, speed and capabilities of technologies that drive worldwide social and economic growth.' 

'Georgia Tech's deep domain expertise at all levels of the computing spectrum – from applications and architecture down to circuits and silicon – position the institute as a natural leader in the emerging research area of manycore computing,' said Dr Mark Allen, senior vice provost for Research and Innovation at Georgia Tech. 'The interdisciplinary environment fostered by the College of Computing's School of Computer Science and the College of Engineering's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering enable our world-class researchers and faculty to revolutionise the field of computer architecture and how it is analysed, taught and studied.'

As part of its mission, the CMC will also look at new ways to incorporate parallel programming and advanced architectures into its core undergraduate computing classes. By teaching today's students to 'think in parallel' at an earlier age, tomorrow's leaders will be better able to develop the advancements needed to maintain the exponential growth rate for computing performance for decades to come.