NEWS

Constellium chooses Altair extrusion software

Constellium, a designer and manufacturer of aluminium technologies, is now using  HyperXtrude, Altair Engineering’s simulation environment for the optimisation of extrusion processes and die designs, to support the development of its extrusion business.

Constellium extrudes aluminium alloys for a wide range of applications in various markets, such as the aerospace, automotive and rail industries. Constellium’s research centre is world-renowned in aluminium metallurgy innovations and offers its skills to the entire company. Its major focus is the support of the growth of the company’s businesses through the design and development of such innovative aluminium-based solutions and processes as melting, casting, recycling, extrusion, rolling and finishing.

'We have decided to use HyperXtrude, the dedicated software in the HyperWorks Suite for the simulation of the extrusion process, because it offers a robust solver and a user-friendly graphical interface,' said Mehdi Ben Tahar, R&D extrusion engineer at Constellium.

'Considering what is available in the market, Altair’s software environment is one of the most efficient solutions in terms of CPU time. Moreover, the close contact we have with the Altair support and development teams is of great advantage for us.'

Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers