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ClinPhone acquires DataLabs

ClinPhone has acquired DataLabs, an electronic data capture (EDC) vendor, enabling ClinPhone to offer a comprehensive suite of clinical trial management and data capture systems. The deal could be worth up to $68.768m to the shareholders of DataLabs if the company meets certain performance targets. All employees within its current headquarters in Irvine, CA and its satellite operations office in Conshohocken, PA will integrate into the ClinPhone organisation.

ClinPhone has already commenced the integration of the acquired EDC technology with its solutions, including randomisation and trial supply management (IVR and IWR), Clinical Trials Management Software (CTMS) and electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePRO) services. This combination of clinical trials software and services provides its pharmaceutical, biotech and CRO clients with a complete end-to-end clinical technology platform.

Since its inception in 1999, DataLabs has developed a pectrum of software designed to streamline and simplify the data collection process, while promoting greater data integrity. These products include electronic data capture, site management, end-user training and validation and compliance tools. Additionally, both ClinPhone and DataLabs will seek to harness the combined power of their integration products to facilitate the sharing of information between disparate systems and dramatically reduce the time, cost and risk of integration projects.

Commenting on the acquisition, ClinPhone's CEO Steve Kent said: 'The assimilation of an established Electronic Data Capture product with our suite of IVR, IWR, CTMS and ePRO solutions gives sponsors a choice that they haven't previously enjoyed. We are already working with clients to manage all other aspects of their clinical trial and we can now collect submission data on their behalf too.'

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