NEWS

BMW uses Dassault in design of I3 electric car

Dassault Systèmes, a provider of 3D design software, 3D Digital Mock Up and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions, has announced today that leading German car manufacturer BMW Group used Dassault Systèmes’ CATIA Composites applications to develop its revolutionary lightweight and emission-free BMW i3 electric car.  

‘Utilising composite structures gives vehicle manufacturers the innovation space they need to create new mobility experiences while meeting ever more stringent regulatory targets,’ said Philippe Laufer, CEO, CATIA, Dassault Systèmes

With the CATIA Composites Design applications composites manufacturing constraints can be embedded early in the conceptual stage, enabling increased design iteration and early collaboration between design and manufacturing. Designers and producers are also able to realistically experience the manufacturing process, visualising the material fibre orientation. This helps detect any deformations that can compromise strength, quality and production due to a difference between the final product and the design intent. 

‘BMW Group leveraged Dassault Systèmes’ comprehensive and integrated industry solution experiences for the design and manufacturing of composite parts and structures,’ said Monica Menghini, executive vice president, corporate strategy, industry and marketing, Dassault Systèmes. 

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