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Workshop to unveil open source software for research websites and more

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HUBbub2010, a workshop for current and potential users of the HUBzero Platform for Scientific Computing to be held in Indianapolis on 13-14 April, will unveil an open source release of HUBzero's core software.HUBzero is a platform for creating powerful websites supporting research, education and collaboration in science, engineering and other fields.

Developed at Purdue University, HUBzero is the YouTube of simulation tools - sort of a Swiss Army Knife for deploying and accessing computational research codes, and visualising and analysing results, all through a familiar web browser interface. Built-in social networking features akin to Facebook create communities of researchers and educators in science, engineering, medicine, almost any field or subject matter and facilitate online collaborations.

The HUBzero platform powers nanoHUB.org and 20 other sites already, delivering hundreds of research tools and seminars to nearly a half million users each year. HUBzero is supported by a consortium of universities including Purdue, Indiana, Clemson and Wisconsin.

The workshop is for people already using a hub who want to learn more, and for those curious about hubs or interested in employing the open source release to establish their own. Presenters will include speakers from the National Science Foundation, existing hub owners and experts in social networking.

Breakout sessions at the event will explain how HUBzero enables a wide spectrum of projects in science and engineering, health care research, social science and education while satisfying NSF and other grant funder cyberinfrastructure requirements in the bargain.