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Swiss National Supercomputing Center improves storage

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As part of an upgrade to a Cray XT5, the Swiss National Supercomputing Center has installed five LSI Engenio 7900 HPC storage systems.

The massively parallel Cray XT5 supercomputer is integrated with five LSI Engenio 7900 HPC systems, delivering a sustained data transfer rate of 20GB/s for the incorporated Lustre file system. The recently completed upgrade has resulted in a system that is the most powerful supercomputer in Switzerland and one of the largest HPC systems in Europe.

'The upgrade to the Cray XT5 with integrated LSI Engenio 7900 storage is a significant step toward sustained petascale computing capability,' said Professor Thomas Schulthess, director of CSCS. 'The exceptional storage performance is important to achieve a well-balanced supercomputer that will enable our users to push the boundaries of simulation-based science and gain scientific insights that would otherwise be impossible.'

The CSCS research facility develops and promotes technical and scientific services for the Swiss research community in the fields of high-performance and high-throughput computing. The new Engenio 7900 HPC systems, which were implemented by Cray, are the latest in a series of successful LSI storage installations at the CSCS, which have been integral to the centre's breakthrough results in research and petascale computing technology. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer with integrated LSI storage will enable large-scale simulation-based science in fields ranging from climatology and geology to genetics, astronomy and experimental medicine.