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NAG lines up ARM collaboration

The Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG), the global numerical software and HPC services company, has announced a technical collaboration with ARM, the world's leading semiconductor IP supplier.

NAG’s highly skilled team of HPC experts, numerical analysts and computer scientists will ensure the algorithms in the NAG Numerical Library and the facilities of the NAG FORTRAN Compiler are available for use on ARM’s 64-bit ARMv8-A architecture-based platforms.

As part of the collaboration, NAG’s trusted numerical software will be ported to the ARMv8-A architecture using the DS-5 Development Environment. NAG Library routines underpin thousands of applications all over the world that require cutting edge numerical capabilities; thus enabling fast and accurate results of complex computation.

By working with NAG, ARM is greatly enhancing the strong HPC infrastructure for ARMv8-A architecture through the enablement of numerical computation at its release.

Speaking of the new partnership, Mike Dewar, NAG chief technical officer, said: 'There's a lot of interest in energy-efficient computing and the community is eagerly awaiting the release of hardware based on the ARM AArch64 architecture. We are delighted that NAG's Library and Compiler will be available on ARMv8-A from day one, and look forward to working with users to exploit its capabilities to the full.'

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