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Multiple point simulation module integrated with SKUA

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Paradigm has integrated the 3D multiple point statistics simulation module based on Ephesia’s IMPALA algorithm in the latest version of Paradigm SKUA (Subsurface Knowledge Unified Approach). This module complements the selection of geostatistical and analytical capabilities of the SKUA Reservoir Module, and utilises the stratigraphically-consistent geological grids made possible by the patented UVT transform. This new-generation facies modelling solution offers enhanced memory usage, performance enhancements through the efficient use of multiple processors, and direct operations on Paradigm’s SKUA grids for more accurate facies modelling.

SKUA with IMPALA’s multiple point simulation enables a reliable and accurate description of the subsurface. Both technologies take advantage of the multicore processing units available on today’s Windows or Linux desktops. Paradigm also offers various tools to facilitate the construction of training images derived from 3D conceptual models, satellite images, seismic data, or stochastically simulated object-based models.

‘Multiple point statistics simulation is becoming a standard for facies modelling and Impala offers an exciting new algorithm which overcomes the limitations of previous implementations in terms of memory requirements and speed,’ said Roland Froidevaux, director of consulting at Ephesia Consult SA. ‘By integrating IMPALA with SKUA, geologists can efficiently create reservoir models that conform to the original geological depositional setting while honouring all known structural and stratigraphic constraints.’