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MathWorks used by more than one million students

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The MathWorks has announced that more than one million students now have access to Matlab and Simulink, the same tools used by engineers across numerous industries, from automotive to financial services. Universities worldwide are enabling students and faculty to use Matlab and Simulink in labs, classrooms and on laptops, improving the pace of research and preparing aspiring engineers for future careers. Imperial College London, Keio University (Japan), Swinburne University of Technology (Australia), and University of Arkansas are among more than 60 institutions that implemented campus-wide licenses in 2009.

More than 5,000 educational institutions across the globe recognise the value of providing students with access to the same technologies used in engineering fields today. Educators who teach with Matlab and Simulink are able to more effectively design curricula that connect theory to practice. These tools help academic faculty mentor students in solving real-world engineering problems through an interactive, hands-on approach to coursework. Campus-wide access to the tools also supports faculty efforts to build a foundation of learning from course to course.

'In today’s international economy, providing top-quality engineering education and developing future engineers are global issues,' said Maureen Maher, manager of education marketing at The MathWorks. 'Universities need to take advantage of every opportunity to train students on the tools used throughout major companies and industries. When used at all levels of university curricula, in both the classroom and the laboratory, MathWorks tools help faculty equip students with the experience needed to gain a competitive edge in the engineering job market upon graduation.'