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King's College London selects gene expression solution

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The Genomics Centre at King's College London is using Qlucore Gene Expression Explorer for advanced data analysis on a wide range of research projects. As a core facility at King's College, the Genomics Centre acts as a central resource for researchers, and also provides access to essential technology and genomics equipment for scientists based at King's College and beyond.

King's College selected Qlucore's bioinformatics application following an in-depth demonstration of the product's data analysis capabilities, followed by a rigourous evaluation period. With the Qlucore software now in place, researchers at the Genomics Centre can expect to shorten analysis time and improve research quality, thanks to the software's ability to provide instant results.

'Qlucore Gene Expression Explorer analyses data more quickly than any product we have used before,' says Dr Matthew Arno, manager, The Genome Centre, King's College. 'The data analysis is actually performed in real time, with the researchers sitting in front of the PC. As a result, researchers can easily form and evaluate a number of different scenarios and hypotheses in rapid succession, in a very short space of time.'

Researchers at the Genomics Centre are currently using the Qlucore software to analyse data produced by a wide variety of research projects, including a study on the effects of metal exposure and ageing in worms (C.elegans). Most recently, scientists have used the software with researchers from Nottingham University's Queen's Medical Centre to study the molecular characteristics of different parts of the human eye, based on important data taken from laser capture microdissected samples.