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GeneBio's Phenyx chosen for Spanish proteomics research network

GeneBio’s Phenyx will become the default protein identification software for ProteoRed at the National Centre for Biotechnology/CSIC in Madrid. ProteoRed network members, consisting of more than 20 research institutions from all over Spain, will then be able to access and send data to this centralised server in order to perform proteomics research.

Phenyx is a software platform for the identification and characterisation of proteins and peptides from mass spectrometry data specifically designed to meet the concurrent demands of high-throughput MS data analysis and dynamic results assessment.

The objective of the ProteoRed consortium is to coordinate and integrate activities of the Spanish proteomics facilities and services in a common network with a nodal structure, so they will support the whole development of proteomics research in Spain. ProteoRed offers services in all the stages involved in the protein analysis process: protein fractionation, separation and purification of peptides and proteins, protein and peptide molecular weight analysis, protein identification, characterisation, sequencing and differential proteomics.

'We believe Phenyx will more than cover the requirements of our network members in terms of reliability, accuracy, flexibility and of course speed,' said Dr Juan Pablo Albar, general coordinator of ProteoRed.

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