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Gaussian 09 now available on Mac, thanks to PGI compilers

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Gaussian, an ongoing collaboration of scientists and academic research groups, has used Portland Group's PGI compilers to port a version of its flagship Gaussian 09 product to Intel processor-based Machintosh computers running 64-bit versions of Mac OS X.

PGI develops and markets high-performance C/C++ and Fortran compilers and development tools that are widely used by engineers and scientists, and are designed to extract maximum performance from the latest multi-core processors from Intel and AMD. PGI Workstation compilers and tools enable building, debugging and profiling of 64-bit multi-core applications on the latest generation of Macs based on processors from Intel and running the Mac OS X operating system.

'A large percentage of academic and government HPC users rely on Macbooks as their mobile computing solution,' said Douglas Miles, director, The Portland Group. 'Now that Gaussian 09 is available on Mac OS X as well as on Linux- and Windows-based systems, these HPC developers can use and work on Gaussian 09 anywhere, any time using optimising PGI Fortran and C/C++ compilers and tools. The potential jump in productivity for these users is huge.'

Gaussian 09 is the latest in the Gaussian series of electronic structure programs. It is used by chemists, chemical engineers, biochemists, physicists and others for research in established and emerging areas of chemical interest. It can be used to study molecules and reactions under a wide range of conditions, including those that produce both stable species and compounds which are difficult or impossible to observe experimentally, such as short-lived intermediates and transition structures.