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Cray snaps up Gnodal team

Following Gnodal entering administration in October 2013, Cray has announced that it has hired the company’s founders and the majority of its highly skilled engineers, subsequently more than doubling the size of its R&D team in Europe. Based in Bristol, England, Gnodal was founded in 2007 and was a leader in high-performance networks.

‘We are very excited that the founders and key engineers at Gnodal have decided to join Cray as part of our global R&D team,’ said Dr Ulla Thiel, Cray vice president, Europe. ‘Since the launch of the Cray Exascale Research Initiative in Europe in 2009, Cray has steadily expanded its R&D base in Europe. Today we have highly-talented software developers at the Cray Europe Exascale Center and at several Cray Centers of Excellence across Europe, and we are now adding significant hardware and software development to our activities in Europe.’

Cray’s purchase from Gnodal was limited to the assignment of certain intellectual property rights including patents and design copyrights. In turn, Cray hired the vast majority of Gnodal’s employees, who will now be working at Cray to develop new technology. Cray did not purchase the ongoing business operations of Gnodal, nor any of its stock in trade or accounts.

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