NEWS
Tags: 

Collaboration enables research tracking

BioData, developer of the life science research and lab management software Labguru, and Altmetric have announced a collaboration that will enable Labguru users to track the popularity of research papers important to their work, in real time. Both are portfolio companies of Digital Science.

Labguru users will now see related news articles, blog posts and publicly-visible social shares on sites including Facebook, Google+ and Twitter for the papers they upload. Metrics are available for any research paper with a DOI (digital object identifier) published since the beginning of 2012.

'Labguru is constantly striving to add features and tools that enable researchers to concentrate on science and simplify their access to relevant and focused information,' said Adam Sartiel, BioData’s CEO. 'We believe that the integration of Altmetric’s attractive "donut" tool into Labguru helps scientists evaluate the impact of scientific papers much better than any traditional scoring method.'

The Scientist named Labguru one of the top 10 innovations of 2012. Labguru also recently added protocols for common methods from Sigma Life Science, Nature Protocols, and Luminex. It includes a product catalogue of 800,000 materials, making it easier for lab managers to control orders and lab inventory.

Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers