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CLC bio heads pan-European comparative genomics project

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CLC bio will be leading a pan-European comparative genomics project, COGANGS (Comparative Genomics and Next Generation Sequencing), to develop a software suite where up to 1,000 genomes can be used as knowledge input in gene regulation analysis.

The project is sponsored by the European Union with €1.6 million, and in addition to CLC bio involves BIOBASE, Germany; deCODE genetics, Iceland; Alfréd Rényi Institute of Mathematics, Hungary; BioRainbow, Russia; and the University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

‘It's highly interesting for us to participate in this project as we can potentially unlock a lot of information in the vast collection of human DNA samples we already have, once this project enables us to do large-scale comparative genomics analyses. We will apply both the initial prototype and the final software package for the analysis of regions that have been identified to have strong disease associations in the human genome,’ said Gísli Másson, director of bioinformatics at deCODE Genetics.

The COGANGS project will develop a software suite where a large number of genomes can be used as knowledge input in gene regulation analysis, like analysis of which factors influence gene regulation, how much impact they have on gene regulation, how they can be identified in the genome of interest, how different gene regulation factors influence each other, and how they work in combination. Such software will be able to provide completely new knowledge, and will have tremendous value to life science researchers globally.