Thanks for visiting Scientific Computing World.

You're trying to access an editorial feature that is only available to logged in, registered users of Scientific Computing World. Registering is completely free, so why not sign up with us?

By registering, as well as being able to browse all content on the site without further interruption, you'll also have the option to receive our magazine (multiple times a year) and our email newsletters.

AMD stars in the Lone Star State

Share this on social media:

The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has deployed AMD SeaMicro SM15000-OP servers with a combined 1,024 AMD Opteron processor cores in 20 rack units.

These servers are the foundational infrastructure for a new computing cloud, powered by OpenStack, and will be used for cutting-edge research and computational biology – creating a powerful cloud computing infrastructure that will advance research in multiple engineering and science disciplines.

Research projects today increasingly require interdisciplinary collaboration, large amounts of data storage and advanced computational capabilities. Procuring and managing computing and storage infrastructure creates overhead that takes up valuable time and energy from a research team’s staff.

With cloud computing, researchers are freed from the burden of managing IT equipment and can focus on their research. This new deployment, also featured in an AMD case study, allows the broader UTSA community to realise the benefits of cloud computing by making it more widely available and easier to use.

'World class computing advances UTSA’s cutting edge research and discovery of new knowledge,' said C. Mauli Agrawal, dean of UTSA's College of Engineering. 'As an emerging research university, this project supports our mission of providing world-class education, outstanding research, and economic contributions to the region.'