PRODUCT

NI LabView DataFinder Toolkit

National Instruments has released the NI LabView DataFinder Toolkit, an extension to its LabView graphical system design platform.

The toolkit further enhances LabView by adding an Internet-like search functionality that indexes and stores the properties of time-based measurement files, making the process of finding data of interest more efficient than the traditional approach of loading all files into memory and manually scanning the results. The toolkit can also be combined with NI DataFinder Server Edition to extend the same search technology to servers so large groups or departments can easily share or analyse their data.

With the LabView DataFinder Toolkit, engineers and scientists can create custom, deployable data management applications using NI DataFinder, an off-the-shelf data index that stores metadata and properties stored in test files. Engineers and scientists can then search NI DataFinder using NI DIAdem software for interactive, offline post-processing or with their own custom applications built using the LabVIEW DataFinder Toolkit. The toolkit can be used to perform simple keyword searches or advanced parametric searches such as finding channel data that exceeds a limit on a particular day or using a particular sensor. Using DataPlugin technology, the toolkit is compatible with any file format and works natively with Technical Data Management (TDM) and Technical Data Management Streaming (TDMS) files.

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