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Thermo Fisher acquires Core Informatics

Thermo Fisher Scientific has announced that it has acquired informatics software provider Core Informatics - a company that specialises cloud-based software to support scientific data management.

In a press release, Thermo Fisher stated that Core’s offerings will significantly enhance Thermo Fisher’s existing informatics solutions and complement its cloud platform, which supports the company’s genetic analysis, qPCR and proteomics systems.

‘The scientific community is rapidly adopting cloud-based laboratory and scientific data management capabilities,’ said Thomas Loewald, senior vice president and chief commercial officer, Thermo Fisher Scientific. ‘Integrating the leading technologies of Core Informatics is part of our strategy to set the standard for digital science solutions, from life sciences discovery to applied markets and manufacturing.’

Core Informatics provides laboratory information management systems (LIMS), electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) technologies and scientific data management solutions (SDMS). The business also offers an Application Marketplace to accelerate deployment across a broad range of industries and scientific workflows

‘We are thrilled to join the Thermo Fisher Scientific team to help accelerate the future of the digital lab,’ said Josh Geballe, chief executive officer, Core Informatics. ‘We are excited to become part of the world leader in serving science and look forward to the additional benefits this will bring to our innovative clients and amazing team.’

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