June/July 2010

FEATURE

Turbulent times

According to the legendary physicist Richard Feynman, turbulence is the last great unsolved problem of classical physics. Even so, computers allow us to study it in great detail, but you must apply such tools with great care. Paul Schreier tries to bring some order to the world of software
intended for these studies of chaos

FEATURE

Super seismic

GPUs are established in both the visualisation and the processing of seismic data. Stephen Mounsey looks at how the technology is used, and at alternative hardware types available to geophysical analysts in the oil and gas industry

Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers