Features

01 January 2006

As an analytical chemist and new user, Alan Wicks enjoyed coming to terms with ChemOffice.

01 January 2006

Ray Girvan wonders why the latest upgrade of Maplesoft's maths program wasn't around when he was at university

01 January 2006

From a dune in the depths of the Sahel desert, Felix Grant accessed free statistics software using a handheld. But, he discovered, there are costs other than monetary ones.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant breaks out from the usual channels and looks for examples of analytical and visualisation software that have not already been reviewed.

01 January 2006

The phrase 'science and technology' always appears with the words in that order. Implicit in the ordering is an assumption that there is a sort of unidirectional flow: science first produces the knowledge and then this is applied in the form of technology. It's akin to the 'central dogma' of molecular biology: that DNA makes RNA makes protein. Information travels along a one-way street.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant used Origin and SigmaPlot to understand the effects of industrialisation on groundwater and, in a modest way, to help after the tsunami.

01 December 2005

Michigan-based software company Gene Codes helped with DNA identification after the 9/11 attacks. By Clare Sansom

01 December 2005

Robustness and fragility may hold the key to advances in biology and medicine, says Brian Cogan

01 December 2005

Jim Miller, director of software and informatics, Agilent Technologies

01 December 2005

Electronic laboratory notebooks are set to become more widespread, suggests Peter Rees

02 October 2005

Although they derive from redundant Victorian prototypes, fuel cells are sometimes regarded as a power source for the future. But first, as Ray Girvan describes, there is a lot of scientific computing to be done

02 October 2005

Getting CPU-intensive computations to run faster used to mean buying a new computer. Not any more, reports Kenneth Shankland and Tom Griffin

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