Features

01 January 2006

One of the staples of popular science journalism is that every development and every discovery tend to be breathlessly reported as a 'breakthrough'. My own favourite is the article in the British newspaper, The Sunday Times, reporting the discovery of a 'gene' for asthma which, the reporter went on to say, would lead to a cure for asthma within five years. The report appeared 15 years ago.

01 January 2006

SciFace's MuPAD 3.0 and MapleSoft's Maple 9.5 make an interesting pairing, even if similarities are coincidental, writes Ray Girvan.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant checks out Minitab's and Systat's latest incarnations.

01 January 2006

A new algorithm from Accelrys may transform powder diffraction indexing, writes David Bradley

01 January 2006

Have haystack, will search for needle. Felix Grant looks at Umetric's latest contribution to multivariate analysis via SIMCA-P

01 January 2006

Brian Cogan assesses the relative strengths of the various optimisation packages on the market.

01 January 2006

Conventional spreadsheets are limited by the fact that each cell holds a single scalar value. Felix Grant finds that DADiSP 2002 - nominally a spreadsheet - breaks through these limitation.

01 January 2006

The international pharmaceutical industry has been phenomenally successful over the past couple of decades in decreasing the burden of human suffering - at least for those of us fortunate enough to live in the prosperous market economies of the developed countries.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant finds that he can travel light, even with a heavy burden of data.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant finds smaller scale offerings from Unistat and Cohort are just fine for jobs of limited complexity.

01 January 2006

Maths education is the main market for Derive, but Ray Girvan thinks this software should have a much wider appeal

01 January 2006

Free maths software is available over the Internet, but Ray Girvan thinks that many users may still prefer to pay

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