Features

01 January 2006

Felix Grant tests out some of Wolfram's spin-off products, which aim to push the company into new market.

01 January 2006

Felix Grant explores visualisation software from the Rocky Mountains whose origins lie in geomapping.

01 January 2006

Ray Girvan investigates TRIZ; a methodology for formalising the invention process according to empirical rules

01 January 2006

One of the fears at the start of the information technology age was 'de-skilling': word-processors would replace typists, and automated machine-tools would make factory workers redundant. Even those with scientific training have felt the effects of such developments: software has made many of the mathematical techniques that I learned at university redundant.

01 January 2006

David Bradley finds that the chemistry content more than makes up for the not so fashionable style in this Finnish software package

01 December 2005

Jim Miller, director of software and informatics, Agilent Technologies

01 December 2005

Electronic laboratory notebooks are set to become more widespread, suggests Peter Rees

01 December 2005

Robustness and fragility may hold the key to advances in biology and medicine, says Brian Cogan

01 December 2005

Michigan-based software company Gene Codes helped with DNA identification after the 9/11 attacks. By Clare Sansom

02 October 2005

Getting CPU-intensive computations to run faster used to mean buying a new computer. Not any more, reports Kenneth Shankland and Tom Griffin

02 October 2005

Once the research has been done, the report has to be written. It used to be boring, but now Felix Grant has found software that makes it bliss

02 October 2005

Although they derive from redundant Victorian prototypes, fuel cells are sometimes regarded as a power source for the future. But first, as Ray Girvan describes, there is a lot of scientific computing to be done

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