PROCESSING

TB2-TL high-density HPC system

28 September 2010

T-Platforms

T-Platforms, in conjunction with Nvidia, has introduced its TB2-TL heterogeneous computing system, which it says represents a new breed of high-density HPC systems with an industry-leading performance-per-watt ratio. The first system to use the Nvidia Tesla X2070 GPU, the TB2-TL is the densest HPC solution on the market. The combination of the T-Platforms T-Blade 2 packaging and Nvidia Tesla 20-series GPUs enables 1-petaFLOPS+ level performance in only 10 standard racks.

Architected for the high end of the supercomputer market, the TB2-TL system enables customers to reach 105 teraflops of peak DP performance in just one standard 19-inch rack, while achieving a record-breaking 1,450 megaflops/W performance-per-watt ratio. The 7U chassis is packed with 32 Tesla 20-series GPUs and 32 Intel Xeon L5600 series CPUs, up to 3GB of memory per CPU core along with 192GB of GDDR5 RAM, 2 QDR 36-port Infiniband switches, and a management and switching module containing optional FPGA-governed Global Barrier and Global Interrupt networks to support extreme scale systems.

Extraordinary energy efficiency is achieved by using an innovative L-shaped heat sink providing the necessary heat dissipation for the entire TB2-TL blade board equipped with Tesla 20-series GPUs, CPU’s and mezzanine memory modules, greatly improving on standard blade tray design used by other system manufacturers.

The single TB2-TL provides almost 4x the performance increase over the same enclosure packed with 64 Intel Xeon E5670 CPUs, while drawing the same amount of power and positioned in a similar price range. Additionally, the T-Platforms Clustrx operating system enables full support for heterogeneous hardware and software environments with near real-time monitoring of petaflops-level installations. The TB2-TL's combination of price/performance, power/performance and petascale-ready operating system makes extreme scale computing available to a wider range of users than ever before.

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